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CRYSTAL KING Reads from Feast of Sorrow

April 25, 2017 | 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Come hear CRYSTAL KING read from her debut novel, Feast of Sorrow, learn about the incredible history of the world’s first known gourmand, and sample ancient Roman nibbles. Held in the Cambridge Public Library downstairs auditorium, Porter Square Books will be on hand to sell copies of the book.

Set amongst the scandal, wealth, and upstairs-downstairs politics of a Roman family, Feast of Sorrow features the man who inspired the world’s oldest cookbook and the ambition that led to his destruction.

On a blistering day in the twenty-sixth year of Augustus Caesar’s reign, a young chef, Thrasius, is acquired for the exorbitant price of twenty thousand denarii. His purchaser is the infamous gourmet Marcus Gavius Apicius, wealthy beyond measure, obsessed with a taste for fine meals from exotic places, and a singular ambition: to serve as culinary advisor to Caesar, an honor that will cement his legacy as Rome’s leading epicure.

Apicius rightfully believes that Thrasius is the key to his culinary success, and with Thrasius’s help he soon becomes known for his lavish parties and fantastic meals. Thrasius finds a family in Apicius’s household, his daughter Apicata, his wife Aelia, and her handmaiden, Passia whom Thrasius quickly falls in love with. But as Apicius draws closer to his ultimate goal, his reckless disregard for any who might get in his way takes a dangerous turn that threatens his young family and places his entire household at the mercy of the most powerful forces in Rome.

Details

Date:
April 25, 2017
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Event Categories:
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Website:
http://www.portersquarebooks.com/event/crystal-king-feast-sorrow

Venue

Cambridge Public Library
449 Broadway
Cambridge, MA 02138 United States
Phone:
(617) 349-4040
Website:
cambridgepubliclibrary.org

Organizer

Porter Square Books
Website:
portersquarebooks.com

Did You Know?

Certain books were “banned in Boston” at least as far back as 1651, when one William Pynchon wrote a book criticizing Puritanism.