Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

LGBTQ Novelists JONATHAN STRONG and KELLY FORD

July 13, 2017 | 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Free

Porter Square Books hosts novelists JONATHAN STRONG and GrubStreet’s KELLY FORD for a discussion of their work.

JONATHAN STRONG’s Quit the Race is “…the story of a loving long-term couple weighing the best interests of their relationship against the desire of each to live the life he wants…Strong uses this drama to explore the nature of love and compromise, the longing to connect, and the need for independent identity and control.” –Stephen McCauley

KELLY  FORD’s Cottonmouths is the story of Emily Skinner.  College was supposed to be an escape for her. But after failing out of school, she’s left with no choice but to return to her small hometown in the Ozarks, a place run on gossip and good Christian values.  She’s not alone. Emily’s former best friend— and childhood crush— Jody Monroe is back with a baby. Emily can’t resist the opportunity to reconnect, despite the uncomfortable way things ended between them and her mom’s disapproval of their friendship. When Emily stumbles upon a meth lab on Jody’s property, she realizes just how far they’ve both fallen.

This event is not ticketed.

Quit the Race and Cottonmouths are currently being sold at Porter Square Books.

If you cannot attend the event, you can still get a signed copy by purchasing the book online and mentioning in the comments section at checkout that you want it signed (or personalized).  This must be completed at least 24 hours prior to the event.

Details

Date:
July 13, 2017
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Categories:
, ,
Event Tags:
, , , , , , , , ,
Website:
http://www.portersquarebooks.com/event/jonathan-strong-kelly-ford

Organizer

Porter Square Books
Website:
portersquarebooks.com

Venue

Porter Square Books
25 White Street
Cambridge, MA 02140 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
617-491-2220
Website:
http://www.portersquarebooks.com

Did You Know?

Certain books were “banned in Boston” at least as far back as 1651, when one William Pynchon wrote a book criticizing Puritanism.